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St. Paul’s Church: Grand History, Grand Living

The Sanctuary is the most exciting and unique London property development to hit the market in 2015. The four unique homes, nestled into the snug walls of St. Paul’s Church in Battersea, combine the best in modern luxury with a tangible bite of London’s extensive history that dates back to the 19th century. We found our sanctuary From its lofty perch on St. John’s Hill, St. Paul’s Church stands proud as a significant monument in British history. Receiving an invitation to restore such a significant site in Battersea into state-of-the-art property for the 21st century was an immensely proud moment for our team and took us on a considerable journey from the initial agreement to the present day. With panoramic views of Battersea’s lush suburbs, fashionable Lavender Hill and the gleaming spires of industry in the distance, the location of the site is ideal for the modern buyer. By retaining its dramatic gothic features, The Sanctuary luxury development stands out amongst the classical Victorian properties in the area, with the large stained glass window providing an extra rich, visual interest to the building. With a focus on luxury and opulence at the helm, each property features impressive suites and furnishings that would please the most discerning of buyers. Original, commanding columns, a concealed room and an authentic entrance are just some of the features that will add intrigue and interest every day. Like any tasteful restoration of a listed building that retains its original features, our restoration work to St. Paul’s Church and grounds in Battersea involved comprehensive research into the history of the site. An Influential History St. Paul’s Church history was created by one of Britain’s seminal architects, Henry Coe, and includes the country’s most influential land owners that helped to shape the city. Links to key moments and individuals that shaped the city as we now see it makes the church an integral thread in London’s vast tapestry. Records took us back to the 1830s when land at St. John’s Hill was sold for development to support a London and Southampton Railway project. The completion of the line proved a catalyst for a quick surge in development and urbanisation in 1840: ten years after the settlement was established near the junction of Plough Lane and St. John’s Hill. Major landowners who occupied the area by the early 19th century included Thomas Carter, Earl Spencer and Charles Wix. The latter, who was thought to have been a builder, monopolised on the increasing popularity of the area after 1840 and bought the land in 1865 for development. The purchase of St. John’s Hill Grove, St. John’s Hill and Louvaine Road extended Charles Wix’s already impressive land and property portfolio that included Brussels Road, property on Cologne Road and the north side of Oberstein Road. This development opportunity was quickly seized upon and an application proposal to construct a temporary church between Wandsworth Road and Brussels Road was sent to the Board of Works for the Wandsworth District on May 2, 1865. Although Henry Coe was appointed as architect at an early stage and designs were put forward in 1860, decision makers felt that it was necessary to erect a temporary church. A former pupil of distinguished architect, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, H. E. Coe was involved with other high profile development projects in London, including the Agricultural Hall and Battersea Park. Following discussions, a temporary church was built in a gothic style that took full advantage of its corner situation and lofty presence on St. John’s Hill. The simple but beautiful church was then made official in the 1868 London Town Plan. Although an organ room was added to the original build in 1885, the church has remained largely as it was built. While the church has remained true to H. E. Coe’s original plans, the addition of a church hall to the north east of the building was a significant addition that greatly increased the size of the site between 1895 and 1916. St. Paul’s Church was thought to have been renovated in the middle of the 20th century after coming under fire from a V1 flying bomb strike during World War Two. Impressive stained glass windows were installed by W. Geddes and C. Blakeman (two distinguished artists of the time) in an attempt to restore the church to its former glory. Following the violence of the incident, the church hall in particular slowly fell into disrepair. Despite full planning permission by Wandsworth Council to convert the unused space into a community centre and nursery in 1975, St. Paul’s Church was presented as derelict with an interior that was unrecognisable as a church. Given the number of vacant buildings in London, we seized the opportunity - like Charles Wix many years ago - to develop the site into a building with exciting residential spaces and a promising future. We recognised the sensitive issues surrounding a listed building in a populated area. Due to its status and our connection to the church, the final build is a result of pain-staking efforts to retain the character of the original gothic structure, with its ragstone exterior and large stained glass features, while rejuvenating the wasted interiors. We are very grateful to Trisha Jean-Marie of Wandsworth Council and to the staff at the Battersea Local History Library for providing historic images and plans that were of great assistance when restoring the building. The Sanctuary is a highly unique property development, offering luxury at its fullest with tangible historic features from its intriguing past. For more information on St. Paul’s Church and The Sanctuary, please contact Nick Goble on 0207 228 9265 or email at ngoble@winkworth.co.uk.

The Sanctuary is the most exciting and unique London property development to hit the market in 2015. The four unique homes, nestled into the snug walls of St. Paul’s Church in Battersea, combine the best in modern luxury with a tangible bite of London’s extensive history that dates back to the 19th century.

We found our sanctuary

From its lofty perch on St. John’s Hill, St. Paul’s Church stands proud as a significant monument in British history. Receiving an invitation to restore such a significant site in Battersea into state-of-the-art property for the 21st century was an immensely proud moment for our team and took us on a considerable journey from the initial agreement to the present day. With panoramic views of Battersea’s lush suburbs, fashionable Lavender Hill and the gleaming spires of industry in the distance, the location of the site is ideal for the modern buyer.

By retaining its dramatic gothic features, The Sanctuary luxury development stands out amongst the classical Victorian properties in the area, with the large stained glass window providing an extra rich, visual interest to the building. With a focus on luxury and opulence at the helm, each property features impressive suites and furnishings that would please the most discerning of buyers. Original, commanding columns, a concealed room and an authentic entrance are just some of the features that will add intrigue and interest every day.

Like any tasteful restoration of a listed building that retains its original features, our restoration work to St. Paul’s Church and grounds in Battersea involved comprehensive research into the history of the site.

The Sanctuary

An Influential History

St. Paul’s Church history was created by one of Britain’s seminal architects, Henry Coe, and includes the country’s most influential land owners that helped to shape the city. Links to key moments and individuals that shaped the city as we now see it makes the church an integral thread in London’s vast tapestry.

Records took us back to the 1830s when land at St. John’s Hill was sold for development to support a London and Southampton Railway project. The completion of the line proved a catalyst for a quick surge in development and urbanisation in 1840: ten years after the settlement was established near the junction of Plough Lane and St. John’s Hill.

Major landowners who occupied the area by the early 19th century included Thomas Carter, Earl Spencer and Charles Wix. The latter, who was thought to have been a builder, monopolised on the increasing popularity of the area after 1840 and bought the land in 1865 for development. The purchase of St. John’s Hill Grove, St. John’s Hill and Louvaine Road extended Charles Wix’s already impressive land and property portfolio that included Brussels Road, property on Cologne Road and the north side of Oberstein Road.

This development opportunity was quickly seized upon and an application proposal to construct a temporary church between Wandsworth Road and Brussels Road was sent to the Board of Works for the Wandsworth District on May 2, 1865. Although Henry Coe was appointed as architect at an early stage and designs were put forward in 1860, decision makers felt that it was necessary to erect a temporary church. A former pupil of distinguished architect, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, H. E. Coe was involved with other high profile development projects in London, including the Agricultural Hall and Battersea Park.

Following discussions, a temporary church was built in a gothic style that took full advantage of its corner situation and lofty presence on St. John’s Hill. The simple but beautiful church was then made official in the 1868 London Town Plan. Although an organ room was added to the original build in 1885, the church has remained largely as it was built.

While the church has remained true to H. E. Coe’s original plans, the addition of a church hall to the north east of the building was a significant addition that greatly increased the size of the site between 1895 and 1916.

St. Paul’s Church was thought to have been renovated in the middle of the 20th century after coming under fire from a V1 flying bomb strike during World War Two. Impressive stained glass windows were installed by W. Geddes and C. Blakeman (two distinguished artists of the time) in an attempt to restore the church to its former glory. Following the violence of the incident, the church hall in particular slowly fell into disrepair.

Despite full planning permission by Wandsworth Council to convert the unused space into a community centre and nursery in 1975, St. Paul’s Church was presented as derelict with an interior that was unrecognisable as a church. Given the number of vacant buildings in London, we seized the opportunity - like Charles Wix many years ago - to develop the site into a building with exciting residential spaces and a promising future. We recognised the sensitive issues surrounding a listed building in a populated area. Due to its status and our connection to the church, the final build is a result of pain-staking efforts to retain the character of the original gothic structure, with its ragstone exterior and large stained glass features, while rejuvenating the wasted interiors.

We are very grateful to Trisha Jean-Marie of Wandsworth Council and to the staff at the Battersea Local History Library for providing historic images and plans that were of great assistance when restoring the building.

The Sanctuary is a highly unique property development, offering luxury at its fullest with tangible historic features from its intriguing past. For more information on St. Paul’s Church and The Sanctuary, please contact Nick Goble on 0207 228 9265 or email at ngoble@winkworth.co.uk.

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