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History is written by the victors

The role of a country house agent is a privileged one. We act for the loveliest properties with charming, interesting clients. As a practice, we certainly sell a higher proportion of listed buildings. And this experience has taught us the protection provided by a listing is much more a shield than a sword. This is demonstrated beautifully at The Manor House, Downton, with its wonderful history and consent for a contemporary kitchen and family room. The Manor House is said to be the oldest continuously inhabited house in the south of England. The original house on this site was built circa 850AD and was used as a rectory. The building then consisted of a barn with cellars underneath, a private chapel and a loft area where the priests slept on rushes. There were considerable alterations in Elizabethan times. Ann Wilkes Allan: 'Sir Thomas Wilkes was a Privy Council to Queen Elizabeth I. Elizabeth leased the Manor House at Downton for a period, believed to have been 45 years, for Sir Thomas Wilkes to reside in. Vicar William Wilkes was a cousin to Sir Thomas Wilkes and was a Vicar at Downton'. The house and all its land was let to the queen at a cost of £84 5s (£84.25) per annum. The Manor was later occupied by Sir Carew Raleigh and the Raleigh family continued to use the house for almost 100 years. According to legend, in 1586 they had to improve the house at short notice for a visit by the Queen, who was on her way to visit the then newly built Breamore House, and Sir Walter sailed a boat up the Avon, beached it near The Tannery and used its timbers to provide paneling and better roof beams. A portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh was hidden behind oak paneling at the house, possibly when he fell from favour. It was found about 150 years later by the then resident farmer, who was facing bankruptcy. He gave the painting to a Salisbury agent, Rawlence and Squarey, in lieu of a debt, and it was sold to the National Portrait Gallery for 100 Guineas (£105) in 1857. It was the first item they had actually purchased, the previous five having been donated. It is now the best known picture of Sir Walter. The Manor was the birthplace of Sir Roger Curtis, who commanded the gunboats at the siege of Gibraltar. Other notable former occupiers include Ralph G Jebb in 1935 and Sir Robert Perkins MP in 1964. Sir Walter Raleigh first came to the attention of Elizabeth I in 1580, when he went to Ireland to help suppress an uprising in Munster. He soon became a favourite of the queen, and was knighted and appointed captain of the Queen's Guard (1587). He became a member of parliament in 1584 and received extensive estates in Ireland. However, Elizabeth was perhaps better known for putting matters of state before affairs of the heart, which earned her the title of the Virgin Queen. Speculation abounds concerning a possibleliaison. Lady Anne Somerset, who wrote the acclaimed biography Elizabeth I, said: "This is not the accepted view. But it is an interesting idea and not totally impossible. "All the evidence suggests she actively discouraged relationships between her ladies and any members of the court. "Did she love Raleigh' I think the truth is she basked in his admiration." Jane Dunn, who wrote the dual biography Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens, said: "This is artistic licence. Throughout her life she was -possessive of attractive young courtiers who caught her eye and she felt shocked when they showed their own emotional attachments. But being possessive isn't -necessarily the same as being in love." Anna Beer, a lecturer in English at Oxford University who has -written a biography of Throckmorton, said she was sceptical of Mr Nicholson's claims. "Bess went behind the Queen's back and that is why she was imprisoned. There may be an emotional truth in these claims but there is no physical or historical evidence to support them." Walter Raleigh was knighted in 1585 but by1592, the queen discovered Raleigh's secret marriage to one of her maids of honour, Elizabeth Throckmorton. This discovery threw Elizabeth into a jealous rage and Raleigh and his wife were imprisoned in the Tower. On his release, in an attempt to find favour with the queen, he set off on an unsuccessful expedition to find El Dorado (the fabled 'Golden Land') rumoured to be situated somewhere beyond the mouth of the Orinoco river in Guiana (now Venezuela). However, he fell out of favour after Elizabeth's death. Elizabeth's successor, James I of England and VI of Scotland, disliked Raleigh, and in 1603 he was accused of plotting against the king and sentenced to death. This was reduced to life imprisonment and Raleigh spent the next 12 years in the Tower of London, where he wrote the first volume of his 'History of the World' (1614). In 1616, Raleigh was released to lead a second expedition to search for El Dorado. The expedition was a failure, and Raleigh also defied the king's instructions by attacking the Spanish. On his return to England, the death sentence was reinstated and Raleigh's execution took place on 29 October 1618. Writing this piece, I sit at a table in an oak paneled room beneath a Jacobean ceiling. History provides the best of the past but to continue, buildings must remain relevant. The Manor House and Manor Cottage, Downton, guide price £1,600,000. Winkworth Salisbury  

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The role of a country house agent is a privileged one. We act for the loveliest properties with charming, interesting clients. As a practice, we certainly sell a higher proportion of listed buildings. And this experience has taught us the protection provided by a listing is much more a shield than a sword. This is demonstrated beautifully at The Manor House, Downton, with its wonderful history and consent for a contemporary kitchen and family room.

sal140002_09

The Manor House is said to be the oldest continuously inhabited house in the south of England. The original house on this site was built circa 850AD and was used as a rectory. The building then consisted of a barn with cellars underneath, a private chapel and a loft area where the priests slept on rushes.

There were considerable alterations in Elizabethan times. Ann Wilkes Allan: 'Sir Thomas Wilkes was a Privy Council to Queen Elizabeth I.

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Elizabeth leased the Manor House at Downton for a period, believed to have been 45 years, for Sir Thomas Wilkes to reside in. Vicar William Wilkes was a cousin to Sir Thomas Wilkes and was a Vicar at Downton'.

Front exterior resized

The house and all its land was let to the queen at a cost of £84 5s (£84.25) per annum.

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The Manor was later occupied by Sir Carew Raleigh and the Raleigh family continued to use the house for almost 100 years.

Front entrance resized

According to legend, in 1586 they had to improve the house at short notice for a visit by the Queen, who was on her way to visit the then newly built Breamore House, and Sir Walter sailed a boat up the Avon, beached it near The Tannery and used its timbers to provide paneling and better roof beams.

sal140002_07

A portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh was hidden behind oak paneling at the house, possibly when he fell from favour.

140611_CO_340Enf-Edit

It was found about 150 years later by the then resident farmer, who was facing bankruptcy. He gave the painting to a Salisbury agent, Rawlence and Squarey, in lieu of a debt, and it was sold to the National Portrait Gallery for 100 Guineas (£105) in 1857.

Fireplace resized

It was the first item they had actually purchased, the previous five having been donated. It is now the best known picture of Sir Walter.

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The Manor was the birthplace of Sir Roger Curtis, who commanded the gunboats at the siege of Gibraltar.

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Other notable former occupiers include Ralph G Jebb in 1935 and Sir Robert Perkins MP in 1964.

Sir Walter Raleigh first came to the attention of Elizabeth I in 1580, when he went to Ireland to help suppress an uprising in Munster. He soon became a favourite of the queen, and was knighted and appointed captain of the Queen's Guard (1587). He became a member of parliament in 1584 and received extensive estates in Ireland. However, Elizabeth was perhaps better known for putting matters of state before affairs of the heart, which earned her the title of the Virgin Queen.

Speculation abounds concerning a possibleliaison. Lady Anne Somerset, who wrote the acclaimed biography Elizabeth I, said: "This is not the accepted view. But it is an interesting idea and not totally impossible. "All the evidence suggests she actively discouraged relationships between her ladies and any members of the court. "Did she love Raleigh' I think the truth is she basked in his admiration."

Jane Dunn, who wrote the dual biography Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, Queens, said: "This is artistic licence. Throughout her life she was -possessive of attractive young courtiers who caught her eye and she felt shocked when they showed their own emotional attachments. But being possessive isn't -necessarily the same as being in love."

Anna Beer, a lecturer in English at Oxford University who has -written a biography of Throckmorton, said she was sceptical of Mr Nicholson's claims. "Bess went behind the Queen's back and that is why she was imprisoned. There may be an emotional truth in these claims but there is no physical or historical evidence to support them."

Walter Raleigh was knighted in 1585 but by1592, the queen discovered Raleigh's secret marriage to one of her maids of honour, Elizabeth Throckmorton. This discovery threw Elizabeth into a jealous rage and Raleigh and his wife were imprisoned in the Tower. On his release, in an attempt to find favour with the queen, he set off on an unsuccessful expedition to find El Dorado (the fabled 'Golden Land') rumoured to be situated somewhere beyond the mouth of the Orinoco river in Guiana (now Venezuela).

However, he fell out of favour after Elizabeth's death. Elizabeth's successor, James I of England and VI of Scotland, disliked Raleigh, and in 1603 he was accused of plotting against the king and sentenced to death. This was reduced to life imprisonment and Raleigh spent the next 12 years in the Tower of London, where he wrote the first volume of his 'History of the World' (1614).

In 1616, Raleigh was released to lead a second expedition to search for El Dorado. The expedition was a failure, and Raleigh also defied the king's instructions by attacking the Spanish. On his return to England, the death sentence was reinstated and Raleigh's execution took place on 29 October 1618.

Writing this piece, I sit at a table in an oak paneled room beneath a Jacobean ceiling.

140903_CO_052Enf

History provides the best of the past but to continue, buildings must remain relevant.

The Manor House and Manor Cottage, Downton, guide price £1,600,000.

Winkworth Salisbury

 

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