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Go West

Housing market reports, it seems, are never far from the headlines. Property, like the weather, is an eternal topic for discussion but fine and settled conditions rarely make for an interesting read. Yet, in a digital age, where what goes up doesn't always come down, why do markets have to be either booming or crashing' London as one of the worlds greatest cities, has been seen as a safe haven for investment in the uncertainty of a post credit crunch world. The addresses of the Monopoly board are known across the globe as an asset class and it is not necessarily surprising they have been sought out and their prices have risen accordingly. Markets ebb and flow, and a rising tide raises all boats. However, the London lead property market of the last five years has created enormous differentials in prices and the value from money to be found some ninety minutes away from the capital is extraordinary. A forever house in Salisbury can be bought for the price of a London flat. Life has changed and will ever continue to do so. This is borne out in the proliferation of everything from smart phones to the way we buy our groceries: what was the norm changes, such is the way of things. This year has seen a shift away from the dominance of large supermarkets. In the same way, as patterns change, we will see a less London lead property market, but in neither case is the shift seismic. Rivers flow from spring to sea, in the same way, money moves around. Shifts are often gradual, sometimes spate but all things find their own level in the end. As someone who has spend many days stood beside or in rivers, the fervent activity of these underwater worlds have some similarities with our own. Salmanoids choose to stay at sea or live their lives in the rivers there were born in. Salmon make epic journeys to rich arctic feeding grounds, making return trips to their birthplace. Most trout stay riparian but some, for their own reasons choose to take advantage of there anadromous abilities and spend time at sea and in the river. Sea trout thrive in both environments but they are drawn to the quieter pace of life of the river after the ocean. The bustle of the great sea had so much to offer but the slower flow of a stream gives both a more gentle environment to raise the next generation and an easy link back to the ocean. Living in London, I worked through the bear markets of the early nineties through to the bull markets that followed. Ten years later, saw London trailing behind the activity of its country cousins. Move on almost another ten years and the tables turned again, such is the cyclical nature of markets. Demographics, technology and working practices have all played their parts and the changes in the last ten years are as remarkable as those that occurred over the hundred years before. The digital world is a place where things can happen quickly but this has not changed everything. We still spend less time deciding to buy a house, when it is right, than on any other meaningful decision or transaction. We move with our heads but we buy with our hearts. Property can be seen from the latest smart device but it can only be viewed and bought by 'trying it on for size' in the only way we know how; to experience how a house feels, after-all, it is the only asset we call home. Matthew Hallett Winkworth Salisbury

Housing market reports, it seems, are never far from the headlines. Property, like the weather, is an eternal topic for discussion but fine and settled conditions rarely make for an interesting read. Yet, in a digital age, where what goes up doesn't always come down, why do markets have to be either booming or crashing'

1367396757_Winkworth Taxi 2

London as one of the worlds greatest cities, has been seen as a safe haven for investment in the uncertainty of a post credit crunch world. The addresses of the Monopoly board are known across the globe as an asset class and it is not necessarily surprising they have been sought out and their prices have risen accordingly. Markets ebb and flow, and a rising tide raises all boats.

Hammersmith Bridge - microsite

However, the London lead property market of the last five years has created enormous differentials in prices and the value from money to be found some ninety minutes away from the capital is extraordinary.

A forever house in Salisbury can be bought for the price of a London flat. Life has changed and will ever continue to do so. This is borne out in the proliferation of everything from smart phones to the way we buy our groceries: what was the norm changes, such is the way of things. This year has seen a shift away from the dominance of large supermarkets. In the same way, as patterns change, we will see a less London lead property market, but in neither case is the shift seismic. Rivers flow from spring to sea, in the same way, money moves around. Shifts are often gradual, sometimes spate but all things find their own level in the end.

Main image (rear elevation) 1.jpg; resized

As someone who has spend many days stood beside or in rivers, the fervent activity of these underwater worlds have some similarities with our own. Salmanoids choose to stay at sea or live their lives in the rivers there were born in. Salmon make epic journeys to rich arctic feeding grounds, making return trips to their birthplace. Most trout stay riparian but some, for their own reasons choose to take advantage of there anadromous abilities and spend time at sea and in the river. Sea trout thrive in both environments but they are drawn to the quieter pace of life of the river after the ocean. The bustle of the great sea had so much to offer but the slower flow of a stream gives both a more gentle environment to raise the next generation and an easy link back to the ocean.

Fish returned

Living in London, I worked through the bear markets of the early nineties through to the bull markets that followed. Ten years later, saw London trailing behind the activity of its country cousins. Move on almost another ten years and the tables turned again, such is the cyclical nature of markets.

Demographics, technology and working practices have all played their parts and the changes in the last ten years are as remarkable as those that occurred over the hundred years before. The digital world is a place where things can happen quickly but this has not changed everything. We still spend less time deciding to buy a house, when it is right, than on any other meaningful decision or transaction. We move with our heads but we buy with our hearts. Property can be seen from the latest smart device but it can only be viewed and bought by 'trying it on for size' in the only way we know how; to experience how a house feels, after-all, it is the only asset we call home.

Matthew Hallett Winkworth Salisbury

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