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Fundamentals in uncertainty

The weather this summer has been outstanding, with a wet spring subsiding to the glorious conditions we are still enjoying. Grain and fruit harvests have benefited, as has the feel good factor of a country it is hard to better when the sun shines. With so many people on their holidays last month, there was little to report and media focus turned to the seasonally adjusted activity of our capitals housing market. But London is not just the prime spots of the Monopoly board and activity spreads out across it, as a rising tide raises all boats. As nature shifts out of summer towards autumn, the beauty of our seasons make the countryside the special place it is. Hedgerows groan with blackberries and sloes as we prepare to celebrate our own harvest festivals. But the questions surrounding so many other parts of the world stage are but some of the uncertainties of the season. The dictionary definition of property is 'a building or buildings and the land belonging to it or them', whereas ours is much more concise; a home. To invest in a happy home is so much more than gauging the right time to buy. Keynesian cyclicity does not allow for the underlying upward path of house prices over time. Despite the peaks (and subsequent troughs) of outrageous fortune, prices are pegged above their pre-spike level, such is the nature of the market. The fundamentals of good schooling and quality of life are unchanging. Many of us who enjoyed living in London decide to move out to give our children the best of the countryside, whilst remaining within striking distance of one of (if not the) worlds best cities. First flats, then a house and then a move to the country; so it seems is the cycle of the London buyer and each stage allows others to move on. Having moved to Hampshire, my regular trips to Salisbury the surrounding countryside were either as an agent, a school parent, a diner, a shopper or by kind invitation to some lovely sporting event. Each time, I left with the feeling that this part of the world had the qualities we were looking for; accessible whilst retaining its rural heart, beautiful surroundings, the friendliest people and wonderful facilities. When we made our own move to Salisbury, it delivers so much more than we could had hoped for. If uncertainty is the new norm, the fundamentals of fine houses in lovely locations remains. Salisbury is special and good houses are in demand. As we are treated to the change to autumn and morning mists hang between a rising sun and a falling moon, I cannot think of a better time to trade life in the capital for a village or within the ancient heart of this ancient city, which the president of the Campaign to Protect Rural England describes as "I like Salisbury very much. It's just the right size for a town - big enough for cinemas and bookshops, small enough to feel friendly and livable".

The weather this summer has been outstanding, with a wet spring subsiding to the glorious conditions we are still enjoying. Grain and fruit harvests have benefited, as has the feel good factor of a country it is hard to better when the sun shines.

With so many people on their holidays last month, there was little to report and media focus turned to the seasonally adjusted activity of our capitals housing market. But London is not just the prime spots of the Monopoly board and activity spreads out across it, as a rising tide raises all boats.

As nature shifts out of summer towards autumn, the beauty of our seasons make the countryside the special place it is. Hedgerows groan with blackberries and sloes as we prepare to celebrate our own harvest festivals. But the questions surrounding so many other parts of the world stage are but some of the uncertainties of the season.

The dictionary definition of property is 'a building or buildings and the land belonging to it or them', whereas ours is much more concise; a home. To invest in a happy home is so much more than gauging the right time to buy. Keynesian cyclicity does not allow for the underlying upward path of house prices over time. Despite the peaks (and subsequent troughs) of outrageous fortune, prices are pegged above their pre-spike level, such is the nature of the market.

The fundamentals of good schooling and quality of life are unchanging. Many of us who enjoyed living in London decide to move out to give our children the best of the countryside, whilst remaining within striking distance of one of (if not the) worlds best cities. First flats, then a house and then a move to the country; so it seems is the cycle of the London buyer and each stage allows others to move on.

140611_CO_261Having moved to Hampshire, my regular trips to Salisbury the surrounding countryside were either as an agent, a school parent, a diner, a shopper or by kind invitation to some lovely sporting event. Each time, I left with the feeling that this part of the world had the qualities we were looking for; accessible whilst retaining its rural heart, beautiful surroundings, the friendliest people and wonderful facilities. When we made our own move to Salisbury, it delivers so much more than we could had hoped for.

If uncertainty is the new norm, the fundamentals of fine houses in lovely locations remains. Salisbury is special and good houses are in demand. As we are treated to the change to autumn and morning mists hang between a rising sun and a falling moon, I cannot think of a better time to trade life in the capital for a village or within the ancient heart of this ancient city, which the president of the Campaign to Protect Rural England describes as "I like Salisbury very much. It's just the right size for a town - big enough for cinemas and bookshops, small enough to feel friendly and livable".

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