child mortarboard gbp briefcase bath coffeecup tree twitter search crosshair fax house papers sort house-pound brochure list-items notes printer video-camera video virtual-video bath bed camera floorplan heart-empty heart-filled heart-empty-thin heart-filled-thin sofa calculator compass share clock list map-pen map-pin pencil save business-card letter phone heard people pointer cross linkedin google-plus facebook arrow-right close triangle-down my-wink my-wink-thick house-circle loading-spinner bell close-circle dog link pinterest school transport wardrobe arrow-up one two three four five six seven tick

Country and town house

Rather than the mercurial beast it is so often portrayed as being, the property market is more akin to a stream finding its way to the sea. Sudden deluges produce great increases in levels, yet everything finds its own level, in time. London had its time in the sun, when the world wanted fundamental investments as safe havens in the aftermath of the financial crisis. But those streets so well-known on the Monopoly boards across the globe are not the only property gold we can offer as an island. Our historic cities are home to some wonderful schools, with all the benefits of a busy town and the backdrop of lovely countryside. And now is the time for the rural city to shine.   The first quarter of 2015 has seen the London focus shift westwards. The benefits of record low long-term mortgage rates and the stamp duty 'giveaway' from the autumn statement have gained real traction in a large part of the market. Trends this season have included a demand for city houses, both large and small. Salisbury offers so much as a city. This is particularly the case for families. There is a wonderful choice of schooling, including two grammar schools. The city has generous green spaces and we are somewhat spoilt for choice from the seemingly constant calendar of cultural events throughout the year. This level city is well-connected, with rail and road linksboth to London and the West Country. Salisbury hasthe largest Cathedral Close in Britain, extending to around 80 acres. A recent description by Lonely Planet is ‘Salisbury’s medieval cathedral close, a hushed enclave surrounded by beautiful houses, has an other-worldly feel. Many of the buildings date from the 13th Century, although the area was heavily restored during an 18thCentury clean-up by James Wyatt. The Close is encircled by a sturdy outer wall, constructed in 1333; the stout gates leading into the complex are still locked every night’. Other descriptions include Bill Bryson ‘There is no doubt in my mind that Salisbury Cathedral is the single most beautiful structure in England and The Close around it the most beautiful space. Every stone, every wall, every shrubis just right. It is as if every person who has touched it for 700 years has only improved it. I could live on a bench in the grounds’. Yet this oasis in the heart of the city iswithin easy reach of a wide range of facilities, schools and transport links. The station and a number of surrounding schools are within walking distance, along the largely level streets of the medieval grid pattern design of Salisbury. Salisbury Cathedral School, Leaden Hall and Bishop Wordsworth’s School in particular are close by. Salisbury Station offers direct South West Trains service to London Waterloo in around 90 minutes. 13 The Close has recently been launched,a well presented house with a fascinating history dating from the 14th Century. The property, along with its neighbour, originated as a medieval canonry, which was rebuilt and extended several times within about a century and a half of the foundation of The Close. The only named owner was William de Chadleshunt (Archdeacon of Salisbury in 1304) whose obit was established here in 1319. The property remained The Vicars’ Hall until The Parliamentary Commissioners annulled the lease in 1650, when the property was sold, then reclaimed in the restoration by the vicars, who divided it into two, and No 13 became a family house. Members of the Goldwyer family lived in the property from 1699 until 1820, in which time various alterations, extensions and improvements were made. In the mid-19th Century, the carriageway to the east of the house was enclosed, and the wonderful first floor drawing room was created. Of particular note are the paneled dining room, and the first floor drawing room with an outlook to Malmesbury House and its famous sundial with the inscription ‘Life’s But a Walking Shadow’. This, surprisingly accurate ancient timepiece can also be seen from some of the bedrooms. To the rear, on the ground floor, is a kitchen/breakfast room with an Aga. Which opens on to a garden room, a flexible space which makes a lovely morning- room/family-room from which to entertain in the garden. Bedrooms are arranged across two floors. Bedroom 1 adjoins a delightful bay fronted room to the rear, currently used as a study/ sitting room, and a separate shower room. The other three bedrooms have access to a further shower room and a bathroom on half landings between the first and second floors. The garden is south facing, largely walled and extends to over 100 ft. The garden has been landscaped and is a charming place to enjoy the property and its setting. 13 The Close, Salisbury, guide price £1,295,000. Winkworth Salisbury 01722 443 000    

Rather than the mercurial beast it is so often portrayed as being, the property market is more akin to a stream finding its way to the sea. Sudden deluges produce great increases in levels, yet everything finds its own level, in time.

London had its time in the sun, when the world wanted fundamental investments as safe havens in the aftermath of the financial crisis. But those streets so well-known on the Monopoly boards across the globe are not the only property gold we can offer as an island. Our historic cities are home to some wonderful schools, with all the benefits of a busy town and the backdrop of lovely countryside. And now is the time for the rural city to shine.

 

33 & 35 New Street - SOLD

The first quarter of 2015 has seen the London focus shift westwards. The benefits of record low long-term mortgage rates and the stamp duty 'giveaway' from the autumn statement have gained real traction in a large part of the market.

Trends this season have included a demand for city houses, both large and small.

113 Dolphin Street front exterior resized

Salisbury offers so much as a city. This is particularly the case for families. There is a wonderful choice of schooling, including two grammar schools. The city has generous green spaces and we are somewhat spoilt for choice from the seemingly constant calendar of cultural events throughout the year. This level city is well-connected, with rail and road linksboth to London and the West Country.

Salisbury hasthe largest Cathedral Close in Britain, extending to around 80 acres. A recent description by Lonely Planet is ‘Salisbury’s medieval cathedral close, a hushed enclave surrounded by beautiful houses, has an other-worldly feel. Many of the buildings date from the 13th Century, although the area was heavily restored during an 18thCentury clean-up by James Wyatt. The Close is encircled by a sturdy outer wall, constructed in 1333; the stout gates leading into the complex are still locked every night’.

Front exterior.jpg resized

Other descriptions include Bill Bryson ‘There is no doubt in my mind that Salisbury Cathedral is the single most beautiful structure in England and The Close around it the most beautiful space. Every stone, every wall, every shrubis just right. It is as if every person who has touched it for 700 years has only improved it. I could live on a bench in the grounds’.

Dining Room (towards fireplace)

Yet this oasis in the heart of the city iswithin easy reach of a wide range of facilities, schools and transport links. The station and a number of surrounding schools are within walking distance, along the largely level streets of the medieval grid pattern design of Salisbury. Salisbury Cathedral School, Leaden Hall and Bishop Wordsworth’s School in particular are close by. Salisbury Station offers direct South West Trains service to London Waterloo in around 90 minutes.

13 The Close has recently been launched,a well presented house with a fascinating history dating from the 14th Century. The property, along with its neighbour, originated as a medieval canonry, which was rebuilt and extended several times within about a century and a half of the foundation of The Close. The only named owner was William de Chadleshunt (Archdeacon of Salisbury in 1304) whose obit was established here in 1319. The property remained The Vicars’ Hall until The Parliamentary Commissioners annulled the lease in 1650, when the property was sold, then reclaimed in the restoration by the vicars, who divided it into two, and No 13 became a family house. Members of the Goldwyer family lived in the property from 1699 until 1820, in which time various alterations, extensions and improvements were made. In the mid-19th Century, the carriageway to the east of the house was enclosed, and the wonderful first floor drawing room was created.

Drawing Room

Of particular note are the paneled dining room,

Dining Room (towards panneling)

and the first floor drawing room with an outlook to Malmesbury House and its famous sundial with the inscription ‘Life’s But a Walking Shadow’.

This, surprisingly accurate ancient timepiece can also be seen from some of the bedrooms.

Bedroom (with sundail outlook)

To the rear, on the ground floor, is a kitchen/breakfast room with an Aga.

Kitchen

Which opens on to a garden room, a flexible space which makes a lovely morning- room/family-room from which to entertain in the garden.

Garden Room

Bedrooms are arranged across two floors. Bedroom 1 adjoins a delightful bay fronted room to the rear, currently used as a study/ sitting room, and a separate shower room.

Study

The other three bedrooms have access to a further shower room and a bathroom on half landings between the first and second floors.

Garden to house. jpg resized

The garden is south facing, largely walled and extends to over 100 ft. The garden has been landscaped and is a charming place to enjoy the property and its setting.

Rear elevation.jpg resized

13 The Close, Salisbury, guide price £1,295,000.

Winkworth Salisbury 01722 443 000

 

 

Find your Local Office

Find your Local Office

Speak to people who, quite simply, love their patch and love what they do.

Get a Free Valuation

Get a Free Valuation

Thinking of selling or letting your property, or just interested to know what it is worth nowadays?