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The magical window

The changes to stamp duty have created mixed emotions in the market. But for anyone selling or buying a property up to £937,000, the new regime is good news. Buyers will have more to spend and sellers no longer have their sale prices pegged at the previous SDLT thresholds. However, it is not necessarily bad news for those involved in property transactions over a million. In fact, there is a magical window. A little like the last weeks of WC Fields spent in bed, sometimes reading a Bible. When asked why, his reply was, "looking for loopholes." It seems there is one in the new system. Between £1,001,000 and £1,124,000 buyers pay less stamp duty than they did previously. Which is also very good news. A quick comparison between what around £1.1m buys in London versus Salisbury suggests things may be too good to remain like this for long but there really has never been a better time to move to the country. In practical terms, buying a house at £1.1m you will save £1,250, which is roughly the cost of 2,500 litres of heating oil (at current prices) or perhaps a new set of tyres for a Land Rover. In a season for giving, this giveaway in property tax is welcome and timely. As we look forward to Salisbury celebrating 800 years of the Magna Carta in 2015, along with Lonely Planet nominating the city as the 7th best place in the world to visit, these are exciting times indeed. Winkworth Salisbury

The changes to stamp duty have created mixed emotions in the market. But for anyone selling or buying a property up to £937,000, the new regime is good news. Buyers will have more to spend and sellers no longer have their sale prices pegged at the previous SDLT thresholds.

However, it is not necessarily bad news for those involved in property transactions over a million. In fact, there is a magical window. A little like the last weeks of WC Fields spent in bed, sometimes reading a Bible. When asked why, his reply was, "looking for loopholes." It seems there is one in the new system.

WINKWORTH_autumn country life

Between £1,001,000 and £1,124,000 buyers pay less stamp duty than they did previously. Which is also very good news.

A quick comparison between what around £1.1m buys in London versus Salisbury suggests things may be too good to remain like this for long but there really has never been a better time to move to the country.

In practical terms, buying a house at £1.1m you will save £1,250, which is roughly the cost of 2,500 litres of heating oil (at current prices) or perhaps a new set of tyres for a Land Rover.

Labradors in a landrover

In a season for giving, this giveaway in property tax is welcome and timely. As we look forward to Salisbury celebrating 800 years of the Magna Carta in 2015, along with Lonely Planet nominating the city as the 7th best place in the world to visit, these are exciting times indeed.

Winkworth Salisbury

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