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From Darkness to Light

Most people will work around forty five years or so during their careers. If we look back just one working lifetime, the changes that have occurred are without precedent. Even compared with the Industrial Revolution, the pace of progress (particularly now in information technology) and the way it has effected our lives, is phenomenal. Working practices will perhaps never be the same, and the same is probably true of the devices and technologies that our lives almost pivot around, in a way we never seen before. If you are not convinced, try losing a smartphone or not being able to use your WiFi for a day; the frustrations are unfathomable - yet ten years ago, such things were not the norm, fifteen years ago most of the things we cannot live without today were unheard of. Yet, in a time when the latest version stateside phone can sell out in a weekend, our love of the finer things from days gone by has seen spikes in the prices of many things vintage, from cars to clothing. The very same can be said of houses, and particularly those from the Georgian era. This much-loved period ranfrom 1714 to 1830, with the Regency era defined as that of George IV as Prince of Wales during the illness of his father George III. The era is often extended to include the short reign of William IV, which ended with his death in 1837. The perfection of symmetry in architecture from this long and eventful period in our history, with itsclassical architecture and delicate ornateness has arguably not been bettered. Certainly, the simplicity of design has continued its relevance of form and function, even in a fast-moving digital age. Although, the Victorian houses which line so many London streets, are lovely. The technological advances perhaps sacrificed some splendour in a quest for modernity. The thermal efficiency of a roaring fireside or kitchen Aga seems less relevant than the joy which comes from living in and keeping these splendid buildings for generations to come. The sacrifices made and eventual victory won in the Napoleonic wars are celebrated in London landmarks. This global conflictconfirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the eighteenth century but in the words of George III, on hearing of Nelson’s death, despite such a victory, the king is said to have burst into tears saying“We do not know whether we should mourn or rejoice. The country has gained the most splendid and decisive Victory that has ever graced the naval annals of England; but it has been dearly purchased.” This weekend seesSalisbury Cathedral’s spectacularAdvent Procession‘From Darkness to Light’begins with the Cathedral in total darkness and silence as the single Advent Candle is litby the end the whole interior of the medieval building is seen in the light of 1300 flickering candles,regarded by many as the un-missable start to the Christmas season. Salisbury is special at any time but as Advent announces the countdown to Christmas celebrations, the Christmas market and ancient streets full of wonderful shop displays and sights and smells - there is a magical quality, not unlike the spectacular sunrises and sunsets we have been treated to this week. The warmth and charm of old buildings is tested to the full on cold autumn days. But buildings can also be enjoyed to the full when full of friends and family. Gardens go to sleep and drawing rooms dazzle as we sell elegant houses at a time of year when we really can sit back and breath in the legacy of the House of Hanover. Matthew Hallett Winkworth Salisbury                

Most people will work around forty five years or so during their careers. If we look back just one working lifetime, the changes that have occurred are without precedent. Even compared with the Industrial Revolution, the pace of progress (particularly now in information technology) and the way it has effected our lives, is phenomenal. Working practices will perhaps never be the same, and the same is probably true of the devices and technologies that our lives almost pivot around, in a way we never seen before. If you are not convinced, try losing a smartphone or not being able to use your WiFi for a day; the frustrations are unfathomable - yet ten years ago, such things were not the norm, fifteen years ago most of the things we cannot live without today were unheard of.

Yet, in a time when the latest version stateside phone can sell out in a weekend, our love of the finer things from days gone by has seen spikes in the prices of many things vintage, from cars to clothing. The very same can be said of houses, and particularly those from the Georgian era. This much-loved period ranfrom 1714 to 1830, with the Regency era defined as that of George IV as Prince of Wales during the illness of his father George III. The era is often extended to include the short reign of William IV, which ended with his death in 1837.

WINKWORTH_autumn country life

The perfection of symmetry in architecture from this long and eventful period in our history, with itsclassical architecture and delicate ornateness has arguably not been bettered. Certainly, the simplicity of design has continued its relevance of form and function, even in a fast-moving digital age. Although, the Victorian houses which line so many London streets, are lovely. The technological advances perhaps sacrificed some splendour in a quest for modernity.

The thermal efficiency of a roaring fireside or kitchen Aga seems less relevant than the joy which comes from living in and keeping these splendid buildings for generations to come. The sacrifices made and eventual victory won in the Napoleonic wars are celebrated in London landmarks. This global conflictconfirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the eighteenth century but in the words of George III, on hearing of Nelson’s death, despite such a victory, the king is said to have burst into tears saying“We do not know whether we should mourn or rejoice. The country has gained the most splendid and decisive Victory that has ever graced the naval annals of England; but it has been dearly purchased.”

This weekend seesSalisbury Cathedral’s spectacularAdvent Procession‘From Darkness to Light’begins with the Cathedral in total darkness and silence as the single Advent Candle is litby the end the whole interior of the medieval building is seen in the light of 1300 flickering candles,regarded by many as the un-missable start to the Christmas season.

Salisbury cloisters

Salisbury is special at any time but as Advent announces the countdown to Christmas celebrations, the Christmas market and ancient streets full of wonderful shop displays and sights and smells - there is a magical quality, not unlike the spectacular sunrises and sunsets we have been treated to this week.

The warmth and charm of old buildings is tested to the full on cold autumn days. But buildings can also be enjoyed to the full when full of friends and family. Gardens go to sleep and drawing rooms dazzle as we sell elegant houses at a time of year when we really can sit back and breath in the legacy of the House of Hanover.

Matthew Hallett Winkworth Salisbury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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