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Architecture and Ambition

As the summer term stretches out ahead, there is indeed much to look forward to. Salisbury has a particularly exciting summer, which includes a wonderful exhibition of Turner's Wessex - Architecture and Ambition at the gorgeous Salisbury Museum, in The Close. At around eighty acres, the Close is the largest cathedral close in the country. Normally, a cathedral close is the residence of canons and other clergy connected with the cathedral, but Salisbury Cathedral Close is cosmopolitan, containing some remarkable examples of medieval and Georgian architecture. It is therefore perhaps understandable, it is often said to be the finest range of English domestic architecture anywhere in the country, the houses reflecting evolving architecture from the thirteenth to the twentieth Century. But The Close is not reserved for ecclesiastical use; it also home to some wonderful schools and there are professional people who have their consulting rooms there. The Close is also home to The Salisbury Museum, situated in the Kings House, on the western side. King's House dates from the thirteenth Century and was significantly extended in the seventeenth Century by Sir Thomas Sadler, who entertained James I there on several occasions, hence naming it the King's House. It was also here that Sue Bridehead, the heroine of Tghomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure, was a student, 'Melchester' being Hardy's pseudonym for 'Salisbury'. We enjoy a similarly magnificent ceiling from that period in our own offices at The Brewery House on Milford Street, Salisbury. The Close has its own constables who, under the control of the chapter clerk, are responsible for the direction of the modest amount of traffic which enters the Close. Salisbury Cathedralis unique in that, following the first three foundation stones being laid by Bishop Poore on 28 April, 1220, it was completed within a single generation, unlike other cathedrals which evolved gradually over centuries, with various additions and renovations. As a result, it has an aesthetic unity of design which adds to its beauty. At over four hundred feet, the spire is the tallest in England, and is visible from every approach to the city. It was added a hundred years after the cathedral's consecration and its immense weight (some six thousand tons) meant much strengthening was required. Salisbury is one of the few Cathedrals built in the shape of a double cross with the arms of the transept branching off on either side. The cloisters are larger and older than those of any other English cathedral. The Cathedral is home to a wealth of history and many unique treasures including an ancient clockmechanism dating from 1326 and said to be the oldest piece of machinery still working in Britain. Originally built to call the bishops to services, it has no hands or clock face, but it rings a chime of bells every hour. The Cathedral has also long been home to the finest of only four original copies of the Magna Carta, which celebrates an eight hundredth centenary this year. In May, Winkworth are sponsoring the first ever exhibition devoted to J M W Turner’s drawings and paintings of Salisbury Cathedral, the city and its surroundings. Situated in the Cathedral Close, directly opposite its west front, the Museum is ideally placed to explore Turner’s relationship with Salisbury and the Cathedral. This relationship began when Turner was a young man and reveals formidable talent and ambition from a very early age. Working with the Turner scholar Ian Warrell, the exhibition focuses on three aspects of Turner’s many depictions of the Salisbury area: firstly, his responses to the Cathedral and town, particularly in connection with the commission he received from local antiquarian, Sir Richard Colt Hoare who inherited the large Stourhead Estate in 1785; secondly the series of views of the neo-gothic Fonthill Abbey that he painted for ‘England’s wealthiest son’, the fascinating and eccentric William Beckford; and finally his work recording the area of central, southern England, sometimes known as Wessex, extending over a period of thirty years. Alongside Turner’s works from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition will include extensive loans from museums and art galleries across the UK including Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, British Museum, Fitzwilliam Museum, National Galleries Scotland, V & A and Whitworth Art Gallery. The exhibition will also be supported by a substantial loan from the Tate collection. This promises to be a unique and exciting exhibition, which will be supported by a programme of events including lectures by Turner scholars, artist workshops, trails around the Close, Cathedral and City to enable those visitingto stand where Turner himself stood to make his work. A window of opportunity indeed. Winkworth Salisbury  

As the summer term stretches out ahead, there is indeed much to look forward to. Salisbury has a particularly exciting summer, which includes a wonderful exhibition of Turner's Wessex - Architecture and Ambition at the gorgeous Salisbury Museum, in The Close.

High Street, Salisbury

At around eighty acres, the Close is the largest cathedral close in the country. Normally, a cathedral close is the residence of canons and other clergy connected with the cathedral, but Salisbury Cathedral Close is cosmopolitan, containing some remarkable examples of medieval and Georgian architecture. It is therefore perhaps understandable, it is often said to be the finest range of English domestic architecture anywhere in the country, the houses reflecting evolving architecture from the thirteenth to the twentieth Century.

High Street Gate, Salisbury

But The Close is not reserved for ecclesiastical use; it also home to some wonderful schools and there are professional people who have their consulting rooms there.

Salisbury cloisters

The Close is also home to The Salisbury Museum, situated in the Kings House, on the western side. King's House dates from the thirteenth Century and was significantly extended in the seventeenth Century by Sir Thomas Sadler, who entertained James I there on several occasions, hence naming it the King's House. It was also here that Sue Bridehead, the heroine of Tghomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure, was a student, 'Melchester' being Hardy's pseudonym for 'Salisbury'.

140903_CO_001

We enjoy a similarly magnificent ceiling from that period in our own offices at The Brewery House on Milford Street, Salisbury.

140903_CO_061Enf

The Close has its own constables who, under the control of the chapter clerk, are responsible for the direction of the modest amount of traffic which enters the Close.

Salisbury Cathedralis unique in that, following the first three foundation stones being laid by Bishop Poore on 28 April, 1220, it was completed within a single generation, unlike other cathedrals which evolved gradually over centuries, with various additions and renovations. As a result, it has an aesthetic unity of design which adds to its beauty.

Salisbury Cathedral

At over four hundred feet, the spire is the tallest in England, and is visible from every approach to the city. It was added a hundred years after the cathedral's consecration and its immense weight (some six thousand tons) meant much strengthening was required. Salisbury is one of the few Cathedrals built in the shape of a double cross with the arms of the transept branching off on either side. The cloisters are larger and older than those of any other English cathedral.

The Cathedral is home to a wealth of history and many unique treasures including an ancient clockmechanism dating from 1326 and said to be the oldest piece of machinery still working in Britain. Originally built to call the bishops to services, it has no hands or clock face, but it rings a chime of bells every hour.

The Cathedral has also long been home to the finest of only four original copies of the Magna Carta, which celebrates an eight hundredth centenary this year.

In May, Winkworth are sponsoring the first ever exhibition devoted to J M W Turner’s drawings and paintings of Salisbury Cathedral, the city and its surroundings. Situated in the Cathedral Close, directly opposite its west front, the Museum is ideally placed to explore Turner’s relationship with Salisbury and the Cathedral. This relationship began when Turner was a young man and reveals formidable talent and ambition from a very early age. Working with the Turner scholar Ian Warrell, the exhibition focuses on three aspects of Turner’s many depictions of the Salisbury area: firstly, his responses to the Cathedral and town, particularly in connection with the commission he received from local antiquarian, Sir Richard Colt Hoare who inherited the large Stourhead Estate in 1785; secondly the series of views of the neo-gothic Fonthill Abbey that he painted for ‘England’s wealthiest son’, the fascinating and eccentric William Beckford; and finally his work recording the area of central, southern England, sometimes known as Wessex, extending over a period of thirty years.
CountryLifespecial15 (1)
Alongside Turner’s works from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition will include extensive loans from museums and art galleries across the UK including Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, British Museum, Fitzwilliam Museum, National Galleries Scotland, V & A and Whitworth Art Gallery. The exhibition will also be supported by a substantial loan from the Tate collection.
This promises to be a unique and exciting exhibition, which will be supported by a programme of events including lectures by Turner scholars, artist workshops, trails around the Close, Cathedral and City to enable those visitingto stand where Turner himself stood to make his work.
A window of opportunity indeed.
Winkworth Salisbury
 

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