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London at work

  A power house for growth, London’s contribution to the UK economy is at a record high. In June this year, the Investec/Real Business 2013 Hot 100 list which cites the UK’s fastest growing privately-owned companies, revealed that 30% of mid-sized business on its list – including five of the top ten – were based in London. It comes as no surprise that people gravitate to the capital for work. And for the large majority this means a daily commute. Statistics show that between 2001 and 2011, the capital’s workday population – that is to say, people working in London – grew by 14%. That’s some 8.68 million people. A staggering figure by any standards. For many areas of London, this means that the number of people travelling into a postcode district for work, are literally – and in some cases more than – doubling the size of the resident population. The City, west end and Docklands – not surprisingly – have the largest daily influx. In the City for example, the number of people travelling into the area for work raises the resident population by 909% (301,826 people); for the west end the comparable figure is 748% (236,555 people). While the working population of inner London has grown rapidly over the past decade, the resident population of outer London has been steadily growing too. While it may come as no surprise that Londoner’s choose to live in outer London and commute in, the scale of the daily commute is astonishing. Figures show that in those areas covered by Winkworth offices, the SW and SE postcodes (excluding the SW1 and SE1 – both large employment centres) have the biggest number of daily commuters. Some 279,000 people – more than the total population of the borough of Greenwich (254,600) - leave their home in these postcodes to work elsewhere in the capital. In SW12 which extends across Clapham South to Balham the local population falls by 35% as commuters head into town. Similar patterns are also evident within East Dulwich, Brixton, Brockley and Highbury, all of which see and outflow of commuter’s equivalent to more than 30% of the usual resident population. NB: For this exercise EC and WC postcodes have been combined

1384960890_commuter_blog_map_small2

 

A power house for growth, London’s contribution to the UK economy is at a record high. In June this year, the Investec/Real Business 2013 Hot 100 list which cites the UK’s fastest growing privately-owned companies, revealed that 30% of mid-sized business on its list – including five of the top ten – were based in London. It comes as no surprise that people gravitate to the capital for work. And for the large majority this means a daily commute. Statistics show that between 2001 and 2011, the capital’s workday population – that is to say, people working in London – grew by 14%. That’s some 8.68 million people. A staggering figure by any standards.

For many areas of London, this means that the number of people travelling into a postcode district for work, are literally – and in some cases more than – doubling the size of the resident population. The City, west end and Docklands – not surprisingly – have the largest daily influx. In the City for example, the number of people travelling into the area for work raises the resident population by 909% (301,826 people); for the west end the comparable figure is 748% (236,555 people).

While the working population of inner London has grown rapidly over the past decade, the resident population of outer London has been steadily growing too. While it may come as no surprise that Londoner’s choose to live in outer London and commute in, the scale of the daily commute is astonishing.

Figures show that in those areas covered by Winkworth offices, the SW and SE postcodes (excluding the SW1 and SE1 – both large employment centres) have the biggest number of daily commuters. Some 279,000 people – more than the total population of the borough of Greenwich (254,600) - leave their home in these postcodes to work elsewhere in the capital.

In SW12 which extends across Clapham South to Balham the local population falls by 35% as commuters head into town. Similar patterns are also evident within East Dulwich, Brixton, Brockley and Highbury, all of which see and outflow of commuter’s equivalent to more than 30% of the usual resident population. NB: For this exercise EC and WC postcodes have been combined

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