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Independent schools: incubating a global workforce for London

Such is the demand among international families to educate their children in London that the Good Schools Guide brought out an exclusively London edition in October, for the first time in its 28-year history. The latest Census of independent school pupils from the Independent Schools Council (ISC) backs up their hunch. For example, the number of Chinese children at independent schools in the UK has risen by 87% since 2007 and families from other European countries sent a growing number of their offspring to UK schools, up by 38% since 2007, including an enormous 213% increase in Russians. China and Hong Kong still make up by far the largest share of non-British pupils, accounting for more than a quarter between them, but it varies widely according to whether parents live in the UK or overseas. Of those whose parents are also living in the UK, the USA is dominant. For more than two-thirds of the 35,720 overseas nationals being educated in Britain’s independent school sector, their parents live overseas. Therefore, when families choose to educate their children in the UK, it is by no means always because they are based here themselves. More often, they want their children to benefit from the quality of a UK education and the access it will give them to networks and opportunities in later life. More than half of overseas pupils are in the sixth form, completing their final two years of school education. And when it comes to choosing a place to work, London is ‘the best city in the world’ according to a survey by the Boston CG of 200,000 people in 189 countries, published in October. It is one of many surveys in which London comes out on top. London is one of only two Alpha++ cities in GaWC’s ranking of global influence; and it is consistently in the top two or three financial centres (Z/Yen); on economic strength (McKinsey); global power (Forbes) Sustainability and quality of life (IESC). The list goes on. Just under half (46%) of all ISC schools are in London and the South East. Through their school years, children at British schools will establish bonds and acquire a familiarity with the UK that will last a lifetime. In this way, schools across the UK are an important part of the business ecosystem incubating the next generation of global workers with an attachment to London and helping to make it such a successful, open and cosmopolitan city. The close relationship between house prices and schools is much weaker in London than elsewhere, because house prices are higher and public transport readily available. An interesting question to consider is where the children might settle as adults and what impact they will have on the property market in future. To find out about schools in your area or properties for sale speak to your nearest office. Click here to find yours.

Such is the demand among international families to educate their children in London that the Good Schools Guide brought out an exclusively London edition in October, for the first time in its 28-year history.

The latest Census of independent school pupils from the Independent Schools Council (ISC) backs up their hunch. For example, the number of Chinese children at independent schools in the UK has risen by 87% since 2007 and families from other European countries sent a growing number of their offspring to UK schools, up by 38% since 2007, including an enormous 213% increase in Russians.

China and Hong Kong still make up by far the largest share of non-British pupils, accounting for more than a quarter between them, but it varies widely according to whether parents live in the UK or overseas. Of those whose parents are also living in the UK, the USA is dominant. Winkworth Blog Oct_v3 For more than two-thirds of the 35,720 overseas nationals being educated in Britain’s independent school sector, their parents live overseas. Therefore, when families choose to educate their children in the UK, it is by no means always because they are based here themselves. More often, they want their children to benefit from the quality of a UK education and the access it will give them to networks and opportunities in later life. More than half of overseas pupils are in the sixth form, completing their final two years of school education.

And when it comes to choosing a place to work, London is ‘the best city in the world’ according to a survey by the Boston CG of 200,000 people in 189 countries, published in October. It is one of many surveys in which London comes out on top. London is one of only two Alpha++ cities in GaWC’s ranking of global influence; and it is consistently in the top two or three financial centres (Z/Yen); on economic strength (McKinsey); global power (Forbes) Sustainability and quality of life (IESC). The list goes on.

Just under half (46%) of all ISC schools are in London and the South East. Through their school years, children at British schools will establish bonds and acquire a familiarity with the UK that will last a lifetime. In this way, schools across the UK are an important part of the business ecosystem incubating the next generation of global workers with an attachment to London and helping to make it such a successful, open and cosmopolitan city.

The close relationship between house prices and schools is much weaker in London than elsewhere, because house prices are higher and public transport readily available. An interesting question to consider is where the children might settle as adults and what impact they will have on the property market in future.

To find out about schools in your area or properties for sale speak to your nearest office. Click here to find yours.

Related posts

Independent schools: incubating a global workforce for London

Such is the demand among international families to educate their children in London that the Good Schools Guide brought out an exclusively London edition in October, for the first time in its 28-year history. The latest Census of independent school pupils from the Independent Schools Council (ISC) backs up their hunch. For example, the number of Chinese children at independent schools in the UK has...

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November 07, 2014

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