child mortarboard gbp briefcase bath coffeecup tree twitter search crosshair fax house papers sort house-pound brochure list-items notes printer video-camera video virtual-video bath bed camera floorplan heart-empty heart-filled heart-empty-thin heart-filled-thin sofa calculator compass share clock list map-pen map-pin pencil save business-card letter phone heard people pointer cross linkedin google-plus facebook arrow-right close triangle-down my-wink my-wink-thick house-circle loading-spinner bell close-circle dog link pinterest school transport wardrobe arrow-up one two three four five six seven tick

Fitzrovia

Lying between the boroughs of Camden in the East and Westminster in the West and tucked discreetly behind the bustle of Tottenham Court Road and Goodge Street is Fitzrovia. As with many residential areas in the centre of the West End it seems a haven, quietly hidden behind the vast assortment of businesses on Tottenham Court Road, yet offering huge value to the area with its proximity to Oxford Circus, Tottenham Court road and Goodge Street. Fitzrovia’s centre is Charlotte Street, filled with bars, restaurants and a number of private galleries, Charlotte Street is known for the being the home of the Fitzroy Tavern, which is what Fitzrovia is named after. The street is known for itself nightlife on the South end of the street with a mix of businesses and academic buildings in the North. Charlotte Street has an eclectic selection of shops, galleries and most prominently the boutique Charlotte Street Hotel which is known for its elegance luxuriousness, as well as it’s quiet but central location. The variety of different businesses and entertainment in Fitzrovia make it appeal to London’s cosmopolitan culture, since Fitzrovia was developed in the 18thcentury it has been the home of many of London’s prominent artists and writers since this period, throughout the 20thCentury, from around 1920 till present day, the area has been the core entertainment region for artists and bohemians, the home of many prominent icons in literary and cultural circles, such as Whistler the nineteenth century painter, while George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf both lived on Fitzroy Square on different occasions. Charlotte Street has entertained many slightly more modern icons, Jimi Hendrix once played at The Speakeasy on Margaret Street, while Bob Dylan made his London Debut at the King & Queen pub on Foley Street. Nowadays the area still has the reputation of a bohemian centre, with a mix homes ranging from tiny flats to grand Georgian or Victorian properties, the cafes, bars and restaurants are stylish and modern, while Fitzroy Tavern, which was what gave the area it’s name, still stands on Charlotte Street, and it’s earlier patrons, including Dylan Thomas and George Orwell, who were among many that made the tavern infamous in the mid 20thCentury, have managed to leave it intact.

Lying between the boroughs of Camden in the East and Westminster in the West and tucked discreetly behind the bustle of Tottenham Court Road and Goodge Street is Fitzrovia. As with many residential areas in the centre of the West End it seems a haven, quietly hidden behind the vast assortment of businesses on Tottenham Court Road, yet offering huge value to the area with its proximity to Oxford Circus, Tottenham Court road and Goodge Street.

Fitzrovia’s centre is Charlotte Street, filled with bars, restaurants and a number of private galleries, Charlotte Street is known for the being the home of the Fitzroy Tavern, which is what Fitzrovia is named after. The street is known for itself nightlife on the South end of the street with a mix of businesses and academic buildings in the North. Charlotte Street has an eclectic selection of shops, galleries and most prominently the boutique Charlotte Street Hotel which is known for its elegance luxuriousness, as well as it’s quiet but central location.

The variety of different businesses and entertainment in Fitzrovia make it appeal to London’s cosmopolitan culture, since Fitzrovia was developed in the 18thcentury it has been the home of many of London’s prominent artists and writers since this period, throughout the 20thCentury, from around 1920 till present day, the area has been the core entertainment region for artists and bohemians, the home of many prominent icons in literary and cultural circles, such as Whistler the nineteenth century painter, while George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf both lived on Fitzroy Square on different occasions. Charlotte Street has entertained many slightly more modern icons, Jimi Hendrix once played at The Speakeasy on Margaret Street, while Bob Dylan made his London Debut at the King & Queen pub on Foley Street.

Nowadays the area still has the reputation of a bohemian centre, with a mix homes ranging from tiny flats to grand Georgian or Victorian properties, the cafes, bars and restaurants are stylish and modern, while Fitzroy Tavern, which was what gave the area it’s name, still stands on Charlotte Street, and it’s earlier patrons, including Dylan Thomas and George Orwell, who were among many that made the tavern infamous in the mid 20thCentury, have managed to leave it intact.

Related posts

Leasehold properties: your quick guide

You may have seen the recent headline that was too good to be true - flat for sale in Knightsbridge priced at just £120,000. The catch? The lease attached to the property was to expire in the following ten weeks. The article raised an important issue for buyers of properties for sale in central London - especially flats. When comparing property prices and analysing search...

Read post

July 30, 2015

Growth at both ends of the central London property market

Recent news affecting buyers of property for sale in central London is coming from opposite ends of the spectrum - both concerning the size of residences. The cost of a one-bedroom flat in London is calculated to be rising up £75 a day, with a thriving audience for entry level property in the city and added interest from buy-to-let investors. At the other end of...

Read post

May 25, 2015

Movement of London executives creates new residential hubs

Central London estate agents are recognising an almost two-tier residential property market emerging in the capital. Executives, bankers and traders - traditionally the heartbeat of the buying and selling property market in central London - have found themselves displaced by billionaires and investors from Russia, China and the Middle East, squeezing them out of favoured neighbourhoods such as Mayfair and Knightsbridge. New centres of property...

Read post

May 05, 2015

Find your Local Office

Find your Local Office

Speak to people who, quite simply, love their patch and love what they do.

Get a Free Valuation

Get a Free Valuation

Thinking of selling or letting your property, or just interested to know what it is worth nowadays?