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How to DIY home-stage without spending a fortune

Thinking of selling' Put your property centre stage with 10 home-staging tips.   Go beyond the smell of brewed coffee and freshly baked bread to sell your home. Here are some top DIY home-staging tips to give your property that extra layer of allure for prospective buyers. Whether you have a one-bedroom city pad or a country cottage, increase your home’s walk-thorough appeal, without spending a fortune. [slideshow_deploy id='3027']   An expert’s view Boots, brollies and buyers: Selling your rural retreat From Matthew Hallett, Winkworth's country house specialist in Salisbury “Any agent worth their salt will arrive well before the viewing. I make sure the heating and lighting are on and plump up all the cushions. I recommend to the vendors that they don't leave out anything that is politically sensitive, such as a mailshot from the local hunt. It's important to make sure there are wellington boots for the prospective buyers to wear when they go outside, plus brollies in case it's raining. In the countryside, gardens play a big part in the sale. Before the buyers arrive, then I will pull up any weeds coming through the gravel path, and make sure there are turtle mats for everyone to wipe their boots on when they come back inside. I also make a point of ensuring that the vendors have the right directions, as mobile phone reception can be patchy. I'll probably be waiting for them at the gate, and open it up if necessary. At the same time, I'll park my car out of sight. You don't want lots of cars cluttering up the drive. Most important of all, though, I will have done a lot of reading up on the house, so that I can answer any questions prospective buyers may have. You need to be able to tell them about the village, about the shops and about how far it is to the station. A little bit of background Radio Three or Four is all right. However, switch it off straight away if you are going to have a conversation; a radio programme is too loud to talk over.” For more expert advise and to find you nearest office click here.

Thinking of selling? Put your property centre stage with 10 home-staging tips.

  Go beyond the smell of brewed coffee and freshly baked bread to sell your home. Here are some top DIY home-staging tips to give your property that extra layer of allure for prospective buyers. Whether you have a one-bedroom city pad or a country cottage, increase your home’s walk-thorough appeal, without spending a fortune.

Canny buyers will look inside wardrobes, check storage space and peer inside fridges. Make sure the fridge is well-stocked with expensive-looking food and drinks. Throw away half-eaten sandwiches and go upmarket. You want buyers to be attracted to a new aspirational lifestyle. And don?t forget to hide all the fridge magnets.

If it's a dining room, lay the table for supper. Ensure each room has a clear use and identity, even if you do only use it for overspill. If the kitchen is big enough to eat in, add a table.

Floor to ceiling curtains give an impression of height and grandeur. Striped rugs make a property seem larger. Choose soft furnishings that add a touch of modernity in town, or cosiness in the country.

Invite a friend around, pretending to be a buyer. Ask them what they like and don't like about your home.

Carpets, definitely (maybe pay to have the job done professionally, if the budget allows). Launder your bed linen and buy in plumped-up bathroom towels or soft white dressing gowns to hang on the bathroom door. You're aiming for the level of presentation you'd get in a top-notch hotel.

Not everyone feels at ease with dogs, cats or hamsters. Best to put your pet (and its bedding) out in the shed, just for the duration of the viewing. Or ask a friend to take the dog for a walk. Alternatively, some homeowners keep their dog or cat around to give a family feel, which is known as pet-staging.

Clear the work surfaces. Open the windows well in advance to make sure there are no lingering smells of cigarettes or last night's fish supper. The biggest favour you can do for your house, is to give it a good airing.

Don't leave out lots of family photographs or collectible knick-knacks. You want your prospective buyers to feel they could be in their own home, not someone else's. Take photographs inside your home. Strangely, it is easier to troubleshoot when you look at photographs.

Cold drinks if it's a hot day, warm drinks if it's cold outside.

Brief viewers about the property beforehand. Let them view it at their leisure. Call them at an agreed time afterwards to get their reaction.



  An expert’s view

Matthew_hallett_WinkworthBoots, brollies and buyers: Selling your rural retreat From Matthew Hallett, Winkworth's country house specialist in Salisbury

“Any agent worth their salt will arrive well before the viewing. I make sure the heating and lighting are on and plump up all the cushions. I recommend to the vendors that they don't leave out anything that is politically sensitive, such as a mailshot from the local hunt. It's important to make sure there are wellington boots for the prospective buyers to wear when they go outside, plus brollies in case it's raining. In the countryside, gardens play a big part in the sale. Before the buyers arrive, then I will pull up any weeds coming through the gravel path, and make sure there are turtle mats for everyone to wipe their boots on when they come back inside.

I also make a point of ensuring that the vendors have the right directions, as mobile phone reception can be patchy. I'll probably be waiting for them at the gate, and open it up if necessary. At the same time, I'll park my car out of sight. You don't want lots of cars cluttering up the drive.

Most important of all, though, I will have done a lot of reading up on the house, so that I can answer any questions prospective buyers may have. You need to be able to tell them about the village, about the shops and about how far it is to the station.

A little bit of background Radio Three or Four is all right. However, switch it off straight away if you are going to have a conversation; a radio programme is too loud to talk over.”


For more expert advise and to find you nearest office click here.

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